7 Tips for Choosing a Website Content Management System

January 5, 2011

A Good CMS Should Work Like a Well Oiled Machine

I’m back after a hectic festive season and hope that everyone who celebrates this period had fun and a good rest.

The need to help several clients update their websites has made me think about what makes a good website Content Management System.

So first, what is a Content Management System?

Content Management System – A Definition

A CMS is a software platform that enables an authorised website editor to access the website to make changes of various kinds. Depending on the complexity of the CMS, and the level of authority the website owner wishes to bestow on the editor, the following functions are possible. I’ll start with the most common functions, moving to those less commmon.

1. Add news stories, press releases, white papers. This is probably ‘level one’ in terms of authorisation.

2. Change the text of the actual website pages. For this the user should have copywriting skills or be working with a copywriter to maintain the house style.

3. Create new web pages

4. Specify the URL for the new page (this is handy for SEO reasons)

What Makes a Good CMS?

A good CMS will contain the following features:

1. A robust architecture. No matter your level of access, you should not be able to screw anything up in terms of the core design

2.It should be possible to easily find the page you are looking for. In-Context Editing, where the copy is viewable within the page design can help with this

3. The CMS should have been designed to help visualise the website both on the temporary (hidden) site and the live site. For example, you should be able to program a link on the temporary site to another page on the site and check it, and these links should also work when the site goes live

4. The navigation should be intuitive. You shouldn’t need to read a manual to work out the majority of the programming.

5. It should be possible to create a new page and to specify keywords within the URL for SEO purposes

6. You should be able to move page order around in the menus

7. It should be possible to move the running order of items such as news stories, case studies, technical papers etc on a page.

Whilst it’s more of a comment than a tip for choosing a Content Management System, it is worth noting that importing text directly from Microsoft Word can be problematic. It is therefore better (although slower) to move the text into Notepad first.

Wishing you all a happy, glitch-free 2011.


Five Ways to Improve your Marketing

October 20, 2010

Improving your Marketing is Really Very Simple

We are living in times of thin resources, both in terms of time and money. It’s not always possible to have the team of marketing and PR professionals inhouse that you might prefer. So how, with limited resources, can you get better at marketing your company and improve your results?

Here is a guerilla-style guide to getting your marketing in better shape.

1. “My website isn’t performing well on the search engines” This is a common problem with many companies. The ranking of websites on the search engines is now an increasingly professional activity. It needs experts. Call in the experts (you can start with me if you like) and get your site reviewed for Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) purposes. This will include a study of the way the website code is written, how the site is structured, the copywriting and design of the site. After this, there will need to be a study of the links to the site from other sites and a plan for how to improve the number of links. This is called Linkbuilding. For more information on this topic, please visit my blog post Planning Search Engine Optimisation from Scratch.

2. “I’m not standing out from my competitors” It’s probably your branding. You may need some work on your branding to help it stand out from the competition. Branding is much more than just the development of your logo, it’s about the essence of who you are as a company. The colours, style and images used for your branding are really only a reflection of a deeper projection of your brand values. This does not mean throwing a bunch of ten pound notes at a wall to see what sticks with an expensive advertising agency, but it does mean developing a coherent approach to explaining who you are and reflecting this in your marketing.

3. “Our competitors seem to be everywhere” That’s probably because their PR and understanding of SEO is better. It’s important to develop an ongoing PR strategy that issues news on a regular basis. Trade press PR should be a monthly activity. Digital PR on websites and blog sites should be a weekly or biweekly activity. Social media (Twitter, LinkedIn) should be a daily activity. Sound a lot? Yes, it is quite a lot of work, but it will certainly help you get new customers.

4. “We need more customers” SEO should help significantly in this area. However, when you are trying to sell business to business services, sales activity is very important. There is absolutely no substitute for metaphorically ‘knocking on doors’, whether this means spending time at the right industry events, responding to online debates, phoning up regular customers and contacts or sending very personalised emails.

5. “Sales are so Patchy” That’s probably because like many companies, sales and marketing are not ongoing activities, but dipped into when business is quiet. Then -bingo! – it all comes at one time. Then goes quiet again. End your own personal cycle of boom and bust and give someone the role of seeking new customers on a weekly basis. Measure their output and performance and give them lots of support and encouragement. Make sure they are searching in different parts of the market and assess which areas are performing best.

It might be tough out there, but there’s no reason to let your competitors steal a march in these easy-to-fix areas. Good luck and feel free to ask any questions on the suggestions raised.


Ten Ways to Improve Your European Marketing

August 27, 2010

European Marketing

European marketing is an challenging task for the uninitiated. This blog is devoted to business to business (‘B2B’) marketing, so although we are not delving into the challenges of labelling a chocolate bar in fifteen languages, nonetheless, European B2B marketing has its own complexities.

Here are some top ten suggestions for getting European marketing right.

10 Tips for Improving Your European B2B Marketing

1. Start with the company name –  conduct research in every country in which you wish to operate. Check how it sounds, what it could mean, and whether it can be pronounced.

2. Register your internet domain names in every country in which you either operate or wish to operate as soon as possible.

3. Take a lot of trouble with your website or websites. There should be a dedicated area for each country.

4. Employ search engine optimisation (SEO) specialists to optimise your website for each country. Start with individual keyword research by country – do not just automatically translate your English keywords. Notwithstanding that, take into account that the US and UK use very developed online marketing compared to some other European countries.

5. Translation is not the same as localisation. Have everything rewritten by an specialist translator so that it resonates in each country.

6. Keep a glossary of industry terms, job titles, and terminology for each country so that your communications feel as if they have been written by the same person. Decide on the gender of your company (for languages where this is a consideration.)

6. Empower your local teams but work closely with them too so that they understand the priorities of the business as a whole. For example, they might have a lucrative business line that they want to prioritise when it might be more important for the company as a whole to deliver a small order early to one of your biggest global customers.

7. Ensure that pricing is managed carefully across all your European facilities.

8. Work with a branding specialist to develop branding which is both consistent but flexible enough to reflect local differences.

9. Keep in close contact with your colleagues, sales agents and contacts across Europe. Learn how the business works in each territory and ask their opinion on key decisions. Be prepared for surprising marketing campaigns and social events to be suggested by local staff. Listen to the reasons why they want to do this activity before making a judgement.

10. Roll up your sleeves and get out there! Understand how the business works by meeting local customers.

Enjoy – have lots of fun – and make the company lots of money too!