Burgeoning Asia

September 18, 2012

Hong Kong – Just One of Asia’s Burgeoning Economies

Last week I was fortunate to be invited to a seminar on the burgeoning Asian economies of Korea, Japan, China and Hong Kong organised by the redoubtable and charming Mei Sim Lai, businesswoman, this year’s Master of the Worshipful Company of World Traders and senior member of the City of London IOD.

Japan continues to dominate the Asian economies despite the recent disaster at Fukushima. The country is one of the seven leading global economies with a strong emphasis on research and intellectual property. Japan boasts and enviable portfolio of successful global companies and is rated one of the safest nations in the world with the best infrastructure. In many ways the the country’s handling of the recent earthquake’s aftermath has reinforced Japan’s reputation as secure and well managed and communications specialists have much to learn from the smoothness of the country’s public relations surrounding the disaster.

Korea has grown 144 times over since it was devastated by war 60 years ago. There is a wonderful quote from Warren Buffet that “Korea, which has intellect and passion, can’t help but succeed”. The country is a technological powerhouse with the highest broadband penetration in the world, a position in the top seven for R&D investment and an IT industry worth $271 billion.

China is of course growing rapidly but the figures, when seen in black and white are astonishing. No longer just a production base, there are 5.4 million mainland private enterprises and an annual GDP growth of 9.4% over the last 10 years. China has a growing middle class that currently stands at 300 million, which is leading the country towards travel, wine purchasing and luxury goods. The country is now the second largest luxury consumer market in the world.

As one of China’s two independent territories (the other being Macao), Hong Kong is a gateway to mainland China with simple taxation and easy communications links. Hong Kong is undergoing an incredible rate of infrastructure development including five new railway projects, the development of the Western Kowloon Cultural District, a bridge linking the territory to Macao and a new Cruise terminal.

Clearly there are enormous opportunities for both trade and consumer business across these markets. There is much in Asia to occupy Western CEOs and Marketing professionals can be sure of enjoyable – if heady – ride. A word of warning came from David Cairns, now with the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and formerly Director of UK Trade & Investment in Japan: beware of ”hot and cold’ marketing within Asia, particularly in Japan. Business Development must be seen as a long term strategy in order to win respect. This is a challenge for public companies where the temptation is often to tweak marketing budgets from year to year depending on last year’s performance.

If you’d like to discuss market development in Asia or anywhere else, I’d be delighted to share some ideas.


How to Write a Press Release

January 19, 2011

Writing Press Releases is Simple

Last week I gave some tips on how to structure a press release template. This week, here is some guidance on writing a press release – assuming that you already have your press release template together.

1. The Headline. The headline should summarise the entire press release and encourage the journalist to read further. If it’s a business to business press release, something along the lines of  ‘Sondberg Printing Announces Acquisition of Greenink Supplies’ would work well. If the press release is for business to consumer, you might want to adjust your tone if the subject is a little lighter; for example ‘UK Consumers Love Peachy Scents this Valentine’s Day’.

2. Writing Style. Your writing style needs to vary depending on the content of your release. Think about the publication or website in which you want your release to appear and write about your news in a way that it likely to appeal to the editor. If you are sending your release to The Telegraph, The Sun or Baking Professionals, the style is going to need to be very different. With B2B PR, you can assume that the editor and the reader will have a lot more background knowledge of the subject.

3. Make a Great First Impression. The first paragraph should summarise all the key points. Remember that a busy editor will want to understand your press release quickly before putting it forward for possible inclusion or rejection.

4. Give Enough Detail but Not Too Much. Use your second paragraph to give enough – but not too much – additional background. About 100 words is enough.

5. Add Quotations. Add some quotations from interested parties. There should be at least one quotation from your company, perhaps from the CEO, plus a quotation from another related group. This could be a client or business partner if the release is about an agreement, or someone who understands the relevance of the news, either an industry spokesperson or consumer expert.

6. Finish with your Contact Details. These should be in the press release template I described last week.

This framework should form a useful template for writing a press release. I’d be happy to answer any questions your have if you leave a comment.


Tips for Creating a Press Release Template

January 12, 2011

A Press Release Template in Less Time Than It Takes to Find the Coffee

If you are planning to release news to print and online journalists, it will help to create a proper press release template. Once you have set up a template, it can be used for future press releases, saving you time. Here are some tips on the essentials that you need to include:

1. Create your press release template in MS Word or another, similarly accessible format. If a new version of Word comes out, use the slightly older version until you are sure that most journalises will be able to open the new format.

2. Add a logo to the top of your document.

3. Underneath, on the left hand side, add ‘For Immediate Release’.

4. In the centre, add the words ‘Press Release’.

5. Underneath, add a headline for the press release such as ‘ABG Graphics Acquires West London Design Company’

6. Start your press release with the location of your news release and the date – for example “London, 15th February 2011”

7. After the main press release, add a final paragraph containing boilerplate about the company; for example

‘About ABG Graphics:

ABG Graphics is a London based graphic design company specialising in design for all types of fashion industry catalogues. Founded in 1985, ABG now has a staff of 165 people in the UK and China and dedicates itself to serving leading names in fashion retail.’

8. At the bottom of the release add a section: ‘For Further Information:’ and then include your contact details which should include your name, your title, telephone number and email address.

These tips should help to get you started with any PR activity. Look out for next week’s post on writing press releases.


Why SEO Your Website?

December 15, 2010

SEO is a Key Component of B2B Marketing

Recently some clients have challenged me on the point of SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) at all. The argument, phrased recently by one of my American clients, is as follows:

“We’re a B2B marketing business. Our clients know who we are, so why should we spend money on Search Engine Optimization improving our organic search listings?”

Here are some good reasons to reconsider this position and using SEO, or natural search as it is also known.

1. In the area in which you are most established, your main clients and contacts may know who you are. But what about the new areas that you’d like to mine for business? Your profile will not be as high in these areas.

2. Companies constantly hire (and fire) employees. The contacts you believe you have in key organisations can change at the drop of a fedora. How confident are you that everyone in the company – now and in the future – knows your company name?

3. Do your existing clients know every single service or product that you offer? If you sell denim but also poplin, it would be pretty sad if one of your biggest denim customers bought their poplin from another company simply because they didn’t know you offered it. This would also be a great opportunity for your competitor.

4. If you’re not doing SEO, your competitors might be. If a journalist wants to write a story on your industry specialism, where are they likely to do their research? Yes, the internet. OK, so Fritz from Glassblowers Weekly might have known you for years, but what if a new, younger reporter was tasked with covering the story?

5. Are you are as well known in all countries as you should be?

6. If you ever wanted to sell your company, where would investors look? It’s very likely that they would see how you compared on the search engines with your competitors. At this point it’s worth stating that poor web performance cannot be fixed overnight.

Quite simply, the internet is too big a showroom not to display a well presented, easy to find digital version of your company. If you get the SEO right at the beginning, and build your website right, it is easy to build on. Good use of Search Engine Optimisation will provide you with ongoing leads, PR opportunities and a raised profile that will bring all sorts of commercial benefits. For further thoughts on this, please visit my earlier blog, Planning Search Engine Optimisation from Scratch.

It’s SEO. It’s giving people a map that takes them to your business. Isn’t it worth drawing a map to help people find your digital HQ?

I look forward to hearing your thoughts.


Five Ways to Improve your Marketing

October 20, 2010

Improving your Marketing is Really Very Simple

We are living in times of thin resources, both in terms of time and money. It’s not always possible to have the team of marketing and PR professionals inhouse that you might prefer. So how, with limited resources, can you get better at marketing your company and improve your results?

Here is a guerilla-style guide to getting your marketing in better shape.

1. “My website isn’t performing well on the search engines” This is a common problem with many companies. The ranking of websites on the search engines is now an increasingly professional activity. It needs experts. Call in the experts (you can start with me if you like) and get your site reviewed for Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) purposes. This will include a study of the way the website code is written, how the site is structured, the copywriting and design of the site. After this, there will need to be a study of the links to the site from other sites and a plan for how to improve the number of links. This is called Linkbuilding. For more information on this topic, please visit my blog post Planning Search Engine Optimisation from Scratch.

2. “I’m not standing out from my competitors” It’s probably your branding. You may need some work on your branding to help it stand out from the competition. Branding is much more than just the development of your logo, it’s about the essence of who you are as a company. The colours, style and images used for your branding are really only a reflection of a deeper projection of your brand values. This does not mean throwing a bunch of ten pound notes at a wall to see what sticks with an expensive advertising agency, but it does mean developing a coherent approach to explaining who you are and reflecting this in your marketing.

3. “Our competitors seem to be everywhere” That’s probably because their PR and understanding of SEO is better. It’s important to develop an ongoing PR strategy that issues news on a regular basis. Trade press PR should be a monthly activity. Digital PR on websites and blog sites should be a weekly or biweekly activity. Social media (Twitter, LinkedIn) should be a daily activity. Sound a lot? Yes, it is quite a lot of work, but it will certainly help you get new customers.

4. “We need more customers” SEO should help significantly in this area. However, when you are trying to sell business to business services, sales activity is very important. There is absolutely no substitute for metaphorically ‘knocking on doors’, whether this means spending time at the right industry events, responding to online debates, phoning up regular customers and contacts or sending very personalised emails.

5. “Sales are so Patchy” That’s probably because like many companies, sales and marketing are not ongoing activities, but dipped into when business is quiet. Then -bingo! – it all comes at one time. Then goes quiet again. End your own personal cycle of boom and bust and give someone the role of seeking new customers on a weekly basis. Measure their output and performance and give them lots of support and encouragement. Make sure they are searching in different parts of the market and assess which areas are performing best.

It might be tough out there, but there’s no reason to let your competitors steal a march in these easy-to-fix areas. Good luck and feel free to ask any questions on the suggestions raised.


10 Tips for Good B2B PR

October 6, 2010

PR is About Connections, through Every Channel including Social Media

PR should form a central element of any good business to business marketing plan. Here are ten tips for building a good PR strategy for your business.

  1. Not all PR is worth the time or trouble. Think about who you are trying to reach and be dogged in screening your target publications and websites. It might give you a boost to see your company name in the Isleworth Gazette, but if your target market is Germans in the manufacturing industry, frankly, what are you doing?
  2. PR has changed. You’re not just dealing with seasoned, or even unseasoned journalists these days, you also need to work with bloggers. Put together a target list of publications, websites and blogs that you are trying to reach, together with  contact details for the publications and websites, and website addresses for the blogs.
  3. Assemble your collateral. Ideally, your press kit should include some good photographs of your products or people at work and photographs of your key personnel. If possible, you should also produce video assets but these need to be produced closely in line with your PR strategy and also in close association with forthcoming features on trade websites.
  4. Put together a press plan for the next few months. Work with the company executives and colleagues to understand which stories can be covered and to find interesting pieces. There are going to be changes as events unfold, but make sure that you have a plan of activity as a starting point. Assemble a list of hot topics of the day. Work with your senior management to agree company views on these issues. Make sure thathey are in agreement with your press plan and understand the importance of the PR strategy. Ask them to be available for interviews and quotes when required.
  5. Create well written press releases, written in the third person, that accurately reflect the company in an unbiased style. Journalists hate salesy press releases.
  6. Send your press release individually to journalists and also release it via a PR newswire service. Follow up with the journalists to make sure they have received your release.
  7. Consider optimising your press release for the search engines and publishing it online on article sites. This can be tricky if the exact wording is critical but is beneficial for SEO.
  8. Interact with bloggers by posting comments against their articles. Make sure that these comments are interesting and make a real contribution to the debate.
  9. Engage in Social Media. Use Twitter as part of your PR activity. Post on a regular basis – about three times a day is ideal. See my article on Twitter for more guidance. Use LinkedIn (for B2B companies) or possibly Facebook in certain cases to establish your company identity and interact with your customers. Many of you are trailblazing in this area, but you may find something useful in my next post on maximising the effectiveness of LinkedIn as a PR tool.
  10. Measure your results after each campaign and measure social media at least once a month. Look at relationships generated with journalists, stories published and coverage in social media. With Twitter, be more concerned with the profile of your followers than the number of followers – it’s not a haggis throwing contest.

It is hard to sum up the entire discipline of business to business PR in one post, but I hope that these tips are a useful starting point. It would be great to hear any experiences from readers in this area.