Is iPad Advertising Like Harry Potter?

February 23, 2011

iPad Advertising is Very Harry Potter

Those who love Harry Potter will remember the portraits that are hung throughout Hogwarts and elsewhere. Living pictures that move and gesture from within their frames. In Harry Potter, the pictures in books move too.

It struck me the other day that real life advertising is becoming increasingly like the Harry Potter portraits and books, which is ironic considering that Harry Potter is set in a mythical and slightly old fashioned world which no references to Harry’s trainers can quite dispell.

So why are ads becoming increasingly interactive and what lessons are there for the keen marketor (with or without a broomstick)?

It is natural that as technology evolves, there will be an interest in stretching the boundaries as much as possible. Think of moving poster sites on the underground, at bus stops and other outdoor advertising locations. These digital billboards have evolved the concept of advertising from a static image to video, with the potential to tell a story in bite-size portions. It is important with this type of medium to consider the angle at which the consumer will see the ad, and whether there is more than one screen available. With the screens that appear on the tube escalators, it’s much better to show different elements of the story on each screen rather than show the same ad on every single screen.

In the same way, as businesses and consumers reach for tablet computers to read publications and get their news, advertising will have the potential to become more interactive, either showing a video or interactive experience, or, more spookily, and in true Harry Potter style, showing video content within a static ad. Already, stock photography sites such as Getty and iStockPhoto have made this type of content available.

So how can this content be used? What does it contribute to a static ad? Video content inserted into a static ad must add something to the message, rather than just be a gimmick. It is easy to distract the viewer and the intention should be to enhance the message. As with a photo, consider the angle of the subject’s eyeline how the composition works across the ad to include this moving content. Take as much trouble as with a photographic stock shot to ensure the mood, tone, and audio work for the brand.

It would be great to hear from digital magicians in this area and those who simply have ideas as to how it would best work.