How to Decide Whether to Exhibit at a Trade Show

January 24, 2011

 

Why Exactly Are You Going Around the World for an Exhibition?

It’s trade show season and across the world companies are asking themselves “Should we go to Broadcast Video Expo / CeBIT / Gamescom (delete or add to as appropriate)?” You get the idea.

It’s all too easy to go to trade shows for the wrong reasons and easy to stay away because the costs seem high. The following points might make it easier to decide one way or the other.

Reasons to Exhibit at a Trade Show

1. Your customers will be there. Not only will you have the opportunity to promote your company to them and entertain them, but you will exert a presence in an area surrounded by competitors.

2. The right potential customers will be there. Ask the organisers to send you a detailed breakdown of job roles and companies who attended the show last year and who have registered for this year’s event. Ask questions around the industry and find out whether the majority of ‘industry people’ are going to the show or whether it’s considered a turkey.

3. You met the right people there last year. Our memories can fail us. Think back and check your notes. Who exactly did you meet last year? What business did you close as a result of the event?

4. There are highly relevant talks taking place. This will indicate the type of visitors who are likely to attend. High quality, relevant talks will also provide added value and draw the right people to the event.

5. Consider the entrance costs. If the event is expensive to attend and in a place that it costly to travel to, you are likely to have fewer visitors but potentially they will be of a higher level. If the event is free and in a large city, there are likely to be more visitors but there will be some ‘tyre kickers’ along the way.

6. Check the date. Have the organisers considered the date of the event? Are the right people likely to be able to attend? For example, if you are promoting vegetarian food products at a large food fair, what other events or religious festivals might keep some key buyers away?

7. Do the numbers add up? If you think you could get perhaps three new customers as a result of the exhibition, and the value of these customers might be $100,000 each, then the cost of a trade show at $8,000 might be OK. If you think that you will not get any customers, or you will only get one customer at $2000, then it’s a waste of money.

Reasons Not to Exhibit at a Trade Show

1. Your competitors will be there. Ok, this might also be a reason to go, but first you need to consider why your competitors are attending. Is it simply because they have always attended? Don’t get drawn into other companies’ lazy thinking.

2. You are offered a good deal for booking early. Woah! Rein in those wild horses and consider the Reasons to Exhibit listed above.

3. The trade show is taking place somewhere nice. This is the worst reason of all. Book a holiday instead!

One last comment about exhibitions before I slide off to book a holiday at the NEC Birmingham ;o) Even if you attend an exhibition with the right delegates, book a great booth space, design a wonderful booth and meet lots of fantastic prospects, it means absolutely zip if you don’t follow up your leads. What’s more, the follow up needs to be within a week after the show. Yes really.


How to Write a Press Release

January 19, 2011

Writing Press Releases is Simple

Last week I gave some tips on how to structure a press release template. This week, here is some guidance on writing a press release – assuming that you already have your press release template together.

1. The Headline. The headline should summarise the entire press release and encourage the journalist to read further. If it’s a business to business press release, something along the lines of  ‘Sondberg Printing Announces Acquisition of Greenink Supplies’ would work well. If the press release is for business to consumer, you might want to adjust your tone if the subject is a little lighter; for example ‘UK Consumers Love Peachy Scents this Valentine’s Day’.

2. Writing Style. Your writing style needs to vary depending on the content of your release. Think about the publication or website in which you want your release to appear and write about your news in a way that it likely to appeal to the editor. If you are sending your release to The Telegraph, The Sun or Baking Professionals, the style is going to need to be very different. With B2B PR, you can assume that the editor and the reader will have a lot more background knowledge of the subject.

3. Make a Great First Impression. The first paragraph should summarise all the key points. Remember that a busy editor will want to understand your press release quickly before putting it forward for possible inclusion or rejection.

4. Give Enough Detail but Not Too Much. Use your second paragraph to give enough – but not too much – additional background. About 100 words is enough.

5. Add Quotations. Add some quotations from interested parties. There should be at least one quotation from your company, perhaps from the CEO, plus a quotation from another related group. This could be a client or business partner if the release is about an agreement, or someone who understands the relevance of the news, either an industry spokesperson or consumer expert.

6. Finish with your Contact Details. These should be in the press release template I described last week.

This framework should form a useful template for writing a press release. I’d be happy to answer any questions your have if you leave a comment.


Tips for Creating a Press Release Template

January 12, 2011

A Press Release Template in Less Time Than It Takes to Find the Coffee

If you are planning to release news to print and online journalists, it will help to create a proper press release template. Once you have set up a template, it can be used for future press releases, saving you time. Here are some tips on the essentials that you need to include:

1. Create your press release template in MS Word or another, similarly accessible format. If a new version of Word comes out, use the slightly older version until you are sure that most journalises will be able to open the new format.

2. Add a logo to the top of your document.

3. Underneath, on the left hand side, add ‘For Immediate Release’.

4. In the centre, add the words ‘Press Release’.

5. Underneath, add a headline for the press release such as ‘ABG Graphics Acquires West London Design Company’

6. Start your press release with the location of your news release and the date – for example “London, 15th February 2011”

7. After the main press release, add a final paragraph containing boilerplate about the company; for example

‘About ABG Graphics:

ABG Graphics is a London based graphic design company specialising in design for all types of fashion industry catalogues. Founded in 1985, ABG now has a staff of 165 people in the UK and China and dedicates itself to serving leading names in fashion retail.’

8. At the bottom of the release add a section: ‘For Further Information:’ and then include your contact details which should include your name, your title, telephone number and email address.

These tips should help to get you started with any PR activity. Look out for next week’s post on writing press releases.


7 Tips for Choosing a Website Content Management System

January 5, 2011

A Good CMS Should Work Like a Well Oiled Machine

I’m back after a hectic festive season and hope that everyone who celebrates this period had fun and a good rest.

The need to help several clients update their websites has made me think about what makes a good website Content Management System.

So first, what is a Content Management System?

Content Management System – A Definition

A CMS is a software platform that enables an authorised website editor to access the website to make changes of various kinds. Depending on the complexity of the CMS, and the level of authority the website owner wishes to bestow on the editor, the following functions are possible. I’ll start with the most common functions, moving to those less commmon.

1. Add news stories, press releases, white papers. This is probably ‘level one’ in terms of authorisation.

2. Change the text of the actual website pages. For this the user should have copywriting skills or be working with a copywriter to maintain the house style.

3. Create new web pages

4. Specify the URL for the new page (this is handy for SEO reasons)

What Makes a Good CMS?

A good CMS will contain the following features:

1. A robust architecture. No matter your level of access, you should not be able to screw anything up in terms of the core design

2.It should be possible to easily find the page you are looking for. In-Context Editing, where the copy is viewable within the page design can help with this

3. The CMS should have been designed to help visualise the website both on the temporary (hidden) site and the live site. For example, you should be able to program a link on the temporary site to another page on the site and check it, and these links should also work when the site goes live

4. The navigation should be intuitive. You shouldn’t need to read a manual to work out the majority of the programming.

5. It should be possible to create a new page and to specify keywords within the URL for SEO purposes

6. You should be able to move page order around in the menus

7. It should be possible to move the running order of items such as news stories, case studies, technical papers etc on a page.

Whilst it’s more of a comment than a tip for choosing a Content Management System, it is worth noting that importing text directly from Microsoft Word can be problematic. It is therefore better (although slower) to move the text into Notepad first.

Wishing you all a happy, glitch-free 2011.